From Micro to Macro: The Effect of Social Distancing on the Supply Chain

As the nation begins the process of reopening after the COVID-19 pandemic, there’s a lot to look forward to. Friends will assemble once more, and we’ll be able to gather at our favorite places to eat, drink and socialize. One challenge in all this togetherness: everyone will be doing it at least six feet apart. Businesses are preparing now for that change.

In restaurants, they are moving tables and putting a hard maximum on the number of people allowed inside. Although the return of patrons generates badly needed revenue, moving tables apart means less diners, resulting in less money coming in the door. In order to maintain a peak level of performance, those restaurants need to turn tables and customers faster to achieve the same amount of revenue.

A similar concept will be introduced into the supply chain, as factories, warehouses and distribution centers come back online. Employees will need to consistently stay six feet apart, forcing managers to figure out how to keep up productivity while adhering to guidelines. Are you prepared for the change?

The Newest Constraint in the Supply Chain: Social Distancing

There are several supply chain constraints that most companies can plan around. These include capacity, throughput, and on occasion, emissions.

Social distancing workersUsing an Extended LEAN approach, managers and facilities are encouraged to reduce the amount of time and distance per process. This reduces waste throughout the production line, improving efficiency and ultimately providing more output with the resources already in place.

But due to social distancing, there’s a new constraint supply chain managers must deal with: the maximum amount of physical distance you can remove from production. Some of these situations are easier to plan for: Truck drivers can stay in their cabs, while using e-signatures for receipts.

Other conditions are going to be much more difficult to apply: In the interest of keeping employees healthy, they must consistently stay six feet apart. Companies now have to determine what that means for receiving, production and shipping. If employees have to maintain a safe distance, how does that affect their critical daily operations? Some companies say they are experiencing a 40 percent decrease in capacity due to the social distancing protocols.

Social Distancing Extends From the Facility and into the Network

The physical plant isn’t the only stakeholder affected by social distancing. The impact of lost production and capacity also extends to your logistics network.

If your output is slower due to social distancing, it can have a ripple effect on everything from loading trucks and time-in-transit to service guarantees. Capacity decreases mean it parcel COVID-19takes more time to load trucks and impedes trucks from moving freight from point-to-point. That cuts into your bottom line.

From there, the issues fall like dominoes. The late truck has more time on the dock, so your freight is arrives at its destination later. When it does, there could be a delivery failure due to a closed dock or a receiver bound by rules prohibiting deliveries outside a set window. Additionally, freight bills could increase because transportation providers are unwilling to wait a long time for freight loading and unloading. Your carrier partners might not be able to meet service times because of your approach to social distancing.

There are ways to approach this that will help your business move forward. Once the impact to individual facilities is determined, it’s possible to reconfigure your logistics network to meet the current capacity needs. Some of the options your team can explore include:

  • Do you need to reduce inbound material shipments until capacity can increase?
  • Should you adjust your outbound schedule to ensure you can maximize transit lanes?
  • Can your team or warehouse be more efficient in managing inbound and outbound freight?

Having a Partner to Help You Adjust for Social Distancing

It’s critically important to have a partner in your corner that not only understands how to configure logistics operations using tried and true techniques, but how to translate them to the broader supply network to balance cost, service and risk. While technology plays a key part into this transformation, these solutions need to be approached with a holistic solution in mind.

As we reopen facilities and plan for the “new normal” for the foreseeable future, it’s important to solve these problems now. Because we have no idea when social distancing practices will ease, the problems you face now won’t go away on their own. Instead, solving them will help you become a “shipper of choice” as activity ramps up. You can also maintain profitability and positively plan for the future.

In this race, Transportation Insight is your complete partner in success. Our technology tools allow you to decide between the best carriers and networking options.We can also help you drive success through supply chain mapping, optimization, and applied Extended LEAN strategies with social distancing in mind. Because we’ve worked through thousands of supply chains with hundreds of companies across industries, we know how to apply the best practices and wisdom around your current and future strategies.

Partnership matters – and Transportation Insight is prepared to help you now and well into the future. Contact us today to get started with a consultation on how your facility can manage productivity despite social distancing.

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